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Two Very Significant Days in One Week

I’m worn out,” she said. “I’m so tired of getting the phone calls, the oversized mail-outs from candidates, and hearing nothing but negativity on the news. I’ve stopped watching it!”

It’s an honest and heartfelt plea for some sort of return to normalcy in this New Year. I’m not sure she is going to get her wish. I guess there may be a “new normal” somewhere down the road, but I don’t see it coming this week or even this month.

For instance, there are two of the most significant days in our nation’s history coming just this week. Every election is touted as being the most important to date, but on Tuesday of this week, our great state of Georgia will hold what truly can be called an historic election.

For all of us who have thought that our state was, thankfully, not in the limelight, all of that changed last November 3rd. It might seem a long time ago, but that was the day when our nation went to the polls to choose who would be our president for the next four years.

I’ve been voting very faithfully for over 50 years, but this past election was the most unusual I have ever seen. It’s also amazing that, here we are, two months past that election, but it’s not really clear who won. Yes, our state legislature has authorized our Electoral College electors to say that Joe Biden won, but there are so many controversies and questions about that day’s voting procedures.

In addition to the presidential election, there were the races for the two Senate seats from Georgia. In the past, those two seats would be Republican, but the same sets of circumstances that upset the applecart for the presidential election upset those seats, too.

Today is Tuesday and Georgia will be going to a runoff election for two Senate seats that will determine the political philosophy of the Senate. That is why today is a most significant day this week.

Even more important is tomorrow. On Wednesday, January 6th, the most important joint session of the United States Congress in my lifetime will meet. The purpose? To decide whether to accept the individual state’s Electoral College electors.

Usually that’s a fairly mundane affair, but accepting the results of the 2020 Presidential election has been far from ordinary. After most Presidential elections, that joint session of Congress is a “rubber stamp” affair. But not this year.

A group of Republican congressmen and women are determined to object to the electors from some states saying that the electoral processes in those states were irregular and unconstitutional. In other words, the results are tainted and they cannot turn a blind eye to those circumstances.

I have no idea what happens on either of these most significant days. Usually, I might have an inkling as to who might win an election, but Tuesday’s Georgia runoff, is up in the air as far as I can tell. I can only hope.

I’m as tired and weary as anyone when it comes to the end of last year and the beginning of this one, but I will be voting. I have too much pride and respect for our state and nation to stay at home when I am called to exercise my privilege of putting in my two cents worth.

Paul wrote in his Letter to the Galatians, “Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up.”