Seminole County Sheriff’s Office busts up dog fighting ring, Humane Society cares for injured pit bulls, dogs

Published 9:19 am Monday, May 2, 2022

The Bainbridge Decatur County Humane Society received four unexpected guests in the early hours of Monday morning. Four dogs were delivered to the shelter after being rescued from a dog-fighting ring in Seminole County the previous night; contrary to other reports, they were not delivered to Port City Animal Hospital. In total, 27 dogs, primarily pit bulls, were rescued; seven guns were recovered; and 22 vehicles were towed from the crime scene.

In total, 15 arrests have been made since. Brandon Baker, from Panama City, Fla., was charged with felony dog fighting; Christopher Brown, from Donalsonville, Ga., was charged with felony dog fighting; Herman Buggs, from Donalsonville, Ga., was charged with felony dog fighting; Temichael Elijah, from Donalsonville, Ga., was charged with felony dog fighting, disorderly house, and convicted felon in possession of a firearm; Robert Fioramonti, from Donalsonville, Ga., was charged with felony dog fighting, disorderly house, and convicted felon in possession of a firearm; Terelle Ganzy, from Panama City, Fla., was charged with felony dog fighting; Cornelious Johnson, from Panama City, Fla., was charged with felony dog fighting; Ramar Lee, from Donalsonville, Ga., was charged with felony dog fighting; Kayla Stelle, from Panama City, Fla., was charged with felony dog fighting; Robert West, from Panama City, Fla., was charged with felony dog fighting; Fredricus White, from Panama City, Fla., was charged with felony dog fighting; Gary Hopkins, from Donalsonville, Ga., turned himself in and was charged with felony dog fighting; Fredica Biggs, Rodrecus Kimble, and Torris Kimble were arrested later.

Ashley White, director of the Humane Society, spoke with the Post-Searchlight about the dogs; according to her description, they had no major injuries, and did not show any major signs of aggression. “There have been busts in the past that we’ve gotten dogs from,” she said. “I think it’s far more prevalent in this area than people like to realize… The thing about it is, the people that are participating don’t always fit the stereotypical criminal profile. It could be someone that’s an upstanding member of the community, it could be a person that owns a business in town.” White pointed to the Michael Vick case as an example. “This is someone that wasn’t even necessarily doing it for the money, he had the money. It’s just a blood sport, and I think it’s, unfortunately, entertainment.”

The dogs were collected later that same day by the USDA, and are set to be taken to undisclosed shelters for rehabilitation, and potentially adoption. “I think it’s a misconception that these dogs are automatically going to be euthanized, because they’re aggressive and not animals that can be rehabilitated,” White said. The vast majority are.”

For anyone who suspects dog fighting may be taking place, White encouraged, “If you see something, say something.”