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Rocks and flood warnings

What’s the first thing you think of when someone mentions flood?

For me, it’s the Great Flood; you know the one Noah built the ark for. But, for most in Southwest Georgia it’s the flood of ’94.

When I was younger, my cousin, sister and I created something called the Rock Founders Club. By created, I simply mean we made it up in my backyard and we were the only three members. We picked up giant rocks we found in the woods behind my house and sat on a large, dead log showing them to each other. Before you question my sanity, it was the 90’s and the rock tumbler toy was very popular. Rocks and geology were ~cool~ in fact, I even wanted to be a geologist in my earlier days. While I never achieved that goal, I did take Geology 101 and 102 in college, so I think I can call it a day.

So, how does our rock collector’s club and the flood mix?

Well, like most Saturdays I was out rock collecting and found a large, mossy rock with seashell imprints on it. I immediately reported it to the club. We were sure we had found a prize rock; no rock we had ever seen had seashells on it.

I ran in to the house to tell my mom, who politely explained seashells probably got mashed up against the rock during the flood and that’s why they were imprinted on there.

I ran out of the house back to our club log more excited than before and told the club what my mom had told me. By that point, we were convinced we had a rock from the Great Flood and needed to call an archaeologist.

I was born in 1995, and up until that point I don’t recall my mom or dad ever mentioning there was another flood.

I ran into the house again and told my mom we had this special rock, we were going to be millionaires and it would be put in a museum.

My mom doubted that very highly and told me to go pick up some other rocks and I would find a lot of them had shell imprints because the flood happened in Albany.

It was a mind-blowing day for me. I remember just thinking, wow, Noah’s Ark floated here.

My mom could not stop laughing and explained that the flood of ’94 was different, but was still a lot of water like the Great Flood.

I mean no disrespect, but the flood of ’94 wasn’t as cool as the Great Flood, and I quickly dismissed that rock and its special meanings. I went on to find greater rocks, specifically a pink one that the club named Lemonade.

Lemonade was an ordinary rock, but due to its odd color, we felt the need to protect it at all cost. We didn’t want seashells or floods disrupting this rock. We always hid it and put leaves around it, making sure no one would see it or touch it. We especially wanted to make sure my dad’s lawnmower wouldn’t run over our prized rock possession.

Anyway, I grew older and grew out of my geologist phase, but this flood warning always reminds me of my special club. The rotted log is gone and so is Lemonade I’m sure, but in some way I hope this smaller flood warning brings some kid in Bainbridge some special rock that they are so passionate about they create a club.