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Thanksgiving thoughts

Over the river and through the woods to Grandmother’s house we go” is the beginning of one of the most familiar Thanksgiving songs. At least for my old memory. I’m thankful a little bit of memory remains but more is forgotten every day.

The New York based media outlet Huffington Post has opined that we could do Planet Earth a big favor by foregoing all the turkey frying or ham baking and eat only vegetables for the holiday. They suggest that staying off the roads and not burning the fossil fuels to get to Grandmother’s house is a really good idea.

I don’t think Americans are going to pay much attention to The Huffington (and puffington) Post this year. Thanksgiving holiday has included the busiest traveling days, some 50 million Americans this year, for a long time.

Shoot, if one thinks about it, the Pilgrims traveled by ship all the way across the Atlantic Ocean to celebrate Thanksgiving. That’s was all the way back in 1620. Thanksgiving is very close to its 400th anniversary.

Donna Sue and I will be going over the creeks and, by highway, through the woods to Momma’s house to celebrate Thanksgiving with brother, sister, and many nephews and nieces.

This past Sunday, many churches, including those I serve, celebrated Thanksgiving Sunday. I’m thankful that the churches I serve are not so large so it’s easy to simply throw open the question for all to answer, “For what are you thankful?”

The answers range from the simple, “I’m just thankful to be able to be here this morning.” In other words, “I’m thankful for another day.” Me too!

Other answers are predictable, but still precious. “I’m thankful for my family.” Me too!

A patriot raised his hand to remind us all how thankful we should be to live in a nation whose freedoms include gathering together to worship without fear of being punished. Amen!

During the service, as we read Psalm 100’s fifth verse, “For the Lord is good,” I thought what if God was not good? What if God was irritated at all the things that we do that are not in line with His wishes for us? He may be irritated and we have given Him plenty of reasons, but I’m thankful that “God gave His only Son that whoever believes in Him will not perish, but have eternal life.”

Another said, “I’m thankful to have been born into a home where daddy and momma cared enough to take me to church.” My daddy “toted’ ice; that is he carried chunks of ice to homes before refrigerators were common.

I don’t know whether I have romanticized this thought or whether it is actually true, but I think I remember standing up in the front seat of my daddy’s ice truck as it pulled up to the church that I call my home church. That may be my first memory!

Finally, a few provincial Thanksgiving thoughts. Provincial means that I’m sort of partial to the province or region in which I was born. Sort of like Lewis Grizzard and his Southern by the Grace of God book.

I’m thankful for fried chicken. I’m thankful that I know what cornbread dressing is and I’m thankful for the momma and sister who know how to make it.

I’m thankful for daddy’s truck and wish I had the old hat he wore when he drove it.

I’m thankful that I am able to write for you these columns. I am blessed every time one of you references these columns when I see you. You’re a blessing to me and I wish all of you Happy Thanksgiving!