Dog survives despite embedded cord

Published 7:33 pm Friday, June 11, 2010

The call came in to animal control in the early evening of June 9. There was a dog with its head cut off. Surely that could not be!

Animal control called the shelter director and headed out to the call. Right here in the center of Bainbridge, she was called to who knows what. Upon arrival she saw a case of an embedded collar (more accurately, an embedded cord). The caller stated that the dog had just wandered up to their dog and no one knew who she belonged to or where she had come from. Thankfully, these people cared enough to try to get help for her.

She was transported to the shelter with the thought that she would be humanely relieved of her suffering by euthanization. In spite of her horrendous neck wound, she was wagging her tail. Dogs are amazing. Would you be that way if someone had done this to you?

So many of these cases have been seen at the shelter, (remember Cupcake a few years ago) and every one of them breaks our hearts not just because of the unbelievable suffering inflicted upon a helpless creature, but because it is so preventable. It takes a special degree of callousness to put a collar, chain or cord around the neck of a young puppy and never, ever check it as the puppy grows. How can anyone be so oblivious as to not notice the initial break in the skin that progresses to a gaping wound?

We decided that perhaps this time we could try to give her a second chance for a good life, so rather than an injection to end her life, she was given a sedative and the treatment commenced.

She is still in some danger, but she’s young and will probably survive and recover.

We have named her Onni, which is Finnish for luck.

Cases like Onni’s; cases of neglect or animal cruelty happen all the time here in Bainbridge as they do in all other cities, big and small, throughout the United States. The animals cannot seek help themselves, but are dependent upon the angels who intercede on their behalf, like the family that called animal control (or the police) on Wednesday evening. We are never short of villains in the community; what we need are more heroes.

Animal control and Humane Society personnel cannot see everything in our community. If we are going to come to the aid of these helpless animals, we need the public to become involved. You can remain anonymous. Please keep your eyes open in your neighborhood. If you work out in the community, and regularly come into close contact with the public, report any situation where you suspect that there is neglect or cruelty.

We thank those of you who have given us tips in the past and who take time to let us know of cases where animals need someone to come to their aid.

City and county animal control officers and the Humane Society personnel are committed to keeping our animals and citizens safe. Won’t you do your part?

For animal control in Bainbridge, please call 248-2038, in the county please call 248-3044, or call the Humane Society at 246-0101.

We will post updates on Onni’s progress on our Web site at www.bainbridgehumanesociety.com.