Deadline for voter registration approaches

Published 10:27am Monday, April 21, 2014

The last day for Georgians to register to vote in time for the May 20 primary is Monday, April 21.

Voters throughout the state must present a photo I.D. to register and can do so online or at the Decatur County Board of Elections and Registration office on Water Street.

Dr. Ray Chambers, who is the chairman of the Decatur County Board of Elections and Registration, said voters in the state really have no excuse for not registering to vote because there is a list of alternatives for a driver’s license if a voter does not have one.

“Georgia is one of the few states that has a picture ID requirement that has met all of the requirements of the supreme court’s decision on voting and I.D.s,” Chambers said.

He explained that if a potential voter did not have a driver’s license, they could go to the Decatur County voting office and get a free special photo I.D. card that was just for voting. A voter could also present a passport, military photo I.D., tribal photo I.D., or government employee I.D. card.

Chambers also noted that voters should not confuse the May 20 primary with a general election. In this primary, voters will only have the chance to vote along their political party’s ticket and not vote for candidates in a differing political party.

“People get confused in primaries and when they go to vote for a friend of theirs and then their friend is not on the ballot,” Chambers said. “Remember that you are only voting for candidates in one party.”

Register to vote at the Decatur County elections office on Water Street or online at the Secretary of State’s website by Monday, April 21.

Included in this primary election will be the gubernatorial race for Georgia, senate and house races and local Decatur County Commission and Decatur County School Board offices.

“The most important offices are at the local level because they affect your daily living — everything that you do and how you live and whether or not you succeed is dependent on the local government officials,” Chambers said. “So whenever there is a local election, including county commission races, people really ought to get out and vote for the candidates of their choice for primary and general elections.”

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