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Author and illustrator Tedd Arnold speaks to children at the Decatur County Library Thursday afternoon about his book “Dirty Gerty” and many others. Arnold inspired the children to draw and write down their ideas so that they could use them for something one day.  Arnold said he wrote down ideas for years and turned them into best-selling children’s books.
Author and illustrator Tedd Arnold speaks to children at the Decatur County Library Thursday afternoon about his book “Dirty Gerty” and many others. Arnold inspired the children to draw and write down their ideas so that they could use them for something one day. Arnold said he wrote down ideas for years and turned them into best-selling children’s books.
 

Archived Story

Famous author Tedd Arnold inspires Bainbridge children at library

Published 9:52pm Friday, January 31, 2014

The Decatur County Library hosted a special speaker Thursday afternoon and the house was packed with children who were anxious to meet a children’s book author at the “rock star level.”
Tedd Arnold, known for writing and illustrating books like the popular “Fly Guy” children’s book series, “Parts,” “No More,” “Water in the Tub,” Green Wilma,” “No Jumping on the Bed,” and “The Yuckiest, Stinkiest, Best Valentine Ever” spoke to a crowd about where the ideas for the books came from.
Arnold gave a presentation about his different series and explained how his own children inspired characters and ideas that went into the books.
“I think that this is one of those things that is like a magical moment in a child’s life,” Decatur County Librarian Carole Albyn said. “To meet a rock star level author in our small town, to have personal interaction with someone of that caliber — it’s just enrichment for the whole community to bring in someone in with this kind of talent.”
There were children from several elementary schools like Elcan King and Potter Street and after school groups like Friendship House. Many other children and their parents from the community attended as well. Albyn was pleased with how intent the children were in listening to Arnold, who seemed to captivate the whole crowd.
“This really gives the children a whole new way of looking at books,” Albyn said. “Now they will look at a book and know if came from someone making it, thinking about it and writing it. As a child, I never connected a book to the author, I always just connected to a book.”
Regional librarian Catherine Vanstone said she had seen Arnold’s programs before and knew they were a hit with children. She said the experience offers something new for the whole community.
“We have programming here at the library to encourage people to come and discover what the library has to offer it has been a while since they have come,” Vanstone said. “It gives us cultural exposure, and a little glimpse to the outside world. Programs like this also lets kids who are artistic and want to write, a chance to see someone who does that for a living and interact with them. It shows you that dreams are attainable.”
Arnold said he wanted children to take away the fact that books are crafted and created.
“These books are made by real people just like them,” Arnold said.
Arnold added that he wanted the children to value reading and said if you keep drawing you will get better at it, if you keep writing you will get better at it.
“But if you keep reading,” Arnold said. “You will get better at everything.”

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